Adress: 115035, Russia, Moscow,
Sadovnicheskaya St. 52/45
The Russian Research and Educational Holocaust Center and the Holocaust Foundation
(map).
Phone/fax: (499) 995-21-82, (495) 953-33-62
E-mail: center@holofond.ru
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Новости

Holocaust denial as a means to falsify the history of WWII

10 2010

Traditionally, the RREHC and the Faculty of Humanities of the Moscow Institute of Open Education jointly organize and conduct a seminar on Holocaust education for postgraduate students. Despite the heavy snowfalls and the ensuing traffic jams in the capital, more than 60 pedagogues took part in the seminar on 10 December.
Methodologists and well-known historians who authored a teacher’s manual on Holocaust education also participated in the seminar. The experience from their cooperation with the RREHC and the Yad Vashem seminars gave the students a better insight in the pedagogical challenges of Holocaust education.


30th November: Exhibition „Jews in Moscow“

30 2010

  The co-chair of the  Holocaust Center, Dr Ilya Altman, emphasised in his speech at the opening of the exhibition „Jews in Moscow: history, culture and tradition“, the value of the exhibits, which come mainly from personal archives and collections. He also stressed the need for increasing the social awareness of this cultural heritage. One part of the exhibition consists of 15 objects and documents from personal collections, which are now kept at the Holocaust Center. This includes mainly pictures and personal irems of the Civil War and both World Wars. The exhibition will take place between 1st and 26th December 2010. 

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About 170 visitors have gathered on 21 November at the Jewish Museum of the Moscow Synagogue on the memorial Pokolonnaya hill where the 65th anniversary of the beginning of the Nuremberg trials was co

21 2010

About 170 visitors have gathered on 21 November at the Jewish Museum of the Moscow Synagogue on the memorial Pokolonnaya hill where the 65th anniversary of the beginning of the Nuremberg trials was commemorated.
Besides Ilya Altman, co-chairman of the Center „Holocaust“, also Yuri Kanner (President of the Russian-Jewish Congress), Dorit Golender (Ambassador of Israel in the Russian Federation) and Ulrich Brandenburg (Ambassador of Germany in the Russian Federation) were attending this event.
Original documents, images that are stored in the State Archives of the Russian Federation, as well as items from the personal collection of Valentina Valizkaja, which served as interpreter at the Nuremberg trials, were shown in the exhibition.
The organizers of the event were the Russian-Jewish Congress, the Jewish Museum and the Russian Research and Educational Center „Holocaust“.
On the pictures you can see Ilya Altman and the Israelian ambassador Dorit Golender.


The Holocaust Center has co-organised the exhibition„

18 2010

18.10.2010.Strasbourg (France)
The Tragedy of the Peoples“, which was prepared by the Central Museum of the Great Patriotic War and was opened in Strasbourg (France). The exhibition displays 32 documents and photographs from the central archive. In the exhibition broucher, Ilya Altman from the partner center „Holocaust“ noted what it means that a section on the Holocaust on the territory of the Soviet states is presented for the first time at the international Russian exhibition.
In Strasbourg an exhibition on the fate of the victims of National Socialism was opened. 

http://er.ru/about/text.shtml?16/3047





Russian Holocaust Essay Laureates and Survivors Testify at UNESCO:”Stalin wanted Me Red, Hitler wanted Me Dead” (Samuel Pisar)

08 2010

  Paris, 8 July 2010
The sixth annual presentation of Russian Holocaust Essay Laureates convened yesterday in Paris under the auspices of UNESCO.
Co-organized by the Simon Wiesenthal Centre-Europe, Association Verbe et Lumière-Vigilance and the Russian Holocaust Foundation, five students – from Moscow, St. Petersburg, Yekaterinburg and Nizhny-Novgorod – selected from over 1,000 submissions, presented their research findings.
 Attended by the Ambassadors of the Russian Federation, the United States of America and Israel, the proceedings were opened by UNESCO Deputy Director-General, Getachew Engida.
Russian Ambassador and President of UNESCO Executive Board, Eleonora Mitrofanova, emphasized the pernicious effects of Holocaust denial and the need for universal acknowledgment of the UN’s Holocaust Commemoration Day on 27 January (the date that Auschwitz was liberated by the Red Army in 1945).
Newsweek Bureau Chief, Christopher Dickey, drew the lessons for contemporary media from Roosevelt’s “Four Freedoms” speech.Auschwitz survivor and international lawyer, Samuel Pisar, in a keynote entitled “Remembrance with Hindsight and Foresight”, spoke as anorphaned child-survivor, calling himself “a young animal reacting
instinctively to danger”, following his mother’s dictum: “do whatever to stay alive!” Noting his later role, during the Cold War, in commercial
transactions and conflict – mitigation between  East and West, Pisar
compared  Soviet Russia  and Nazi Germany as “ Stalin wanted Me Red, Hitler wanted Me Dead”, adding his debt to both the US Army  an the Red Army for saving his life.
UNESCO Education expert and Sorbonne President Georges Haddad, described
his sector’s Holocaust pedagogy and his family's World War II experience in Tunisia.
Dr. Ilya Altman, co-Chair of the Russian Holocaust Сenter in Moscow summarized its activities in the Former Soviet Union and the selection process of the Essay laureates.
Board members of Verbe et Lumière-Vigilance were led by Lithuanian – born child survivor, Alexandre Kaplan, and the Simon Wiesenthal Centre-France President, Richard Odier.
The Centre’s Director for International Relations, Dr. Shimon Samuels, thanked UNESCO and, especially, special Adviser Dr. Graciela Vaserman Samuels, for conceiving the event.
He also acknowledged that “ as a British Jew, born just after World War II, his family was saved by 30 miles of Channel water  from theHolocaust  raging on the continent.”
“Moreover”, he stressed, “Hitler’s invasion of the UK was forestalled by
the Eastern Front. Thus, my life was spared by the Red Army and over 25
million Soviet casualties”.
(L-R)Back Row. Dr.Shimon Samuels, Christopher Dickey, Samuel Pisar, Dr. Ilya Altman, Russian Ambassador Eleonora
Mitrofanova, DDG Engida, Judith Pisah, Kristen Killion, U.S Ambassador David Killion, Richard Odier, Annette Blum, Dr.Graciela Samuels
Front Row , Sergei Ponomarev, Elizaveta Yakimova, Elena Testova, Alexeev Dmitry, Evgenia Mushtavinskaya

http://unesco.usmission.gov/russian-holocaust-essay-laureates.html

http://photos.state.gov/libraries/unesco/182433/pdfs/eb-chairman-statement-holocaust-essay-event.pdf

http://portal.unesco.org/education/en/ev.php-URL_ID=57735&URL_DO=DO_TOPIC&URL_SECTION=201.html


 





Holocaust contest ceremony : Statement of H.E. Ms Eleonora Valentinovna Mitrofanova

07 2010

UNESCO Headquarters, Paris
7 July 2010
Deputy Director-General,
Director of International Relations of the Simon Wiesenthal Centre,
Co-President of the Russian Research and Educational Holocaust Centre,
Head of Paris Newsweek Bureau,
Mr and Ms Pisar,
Prize-winners,
Ladies and Gentlemen,
This year, the international community marks the 65th anniversary of the end of the Second World War, a war which led to the systematic, full-scale extermination of millions of wholly innocent victims. The preservation of the memory of the Holocaust and the fight against all forms of Holocaust denial, are enshrined forever in resolutions of the United Nations General Assembly. 27 January is proclaimed the International Day of Commemoration in Memory of the Victims of the Holocaust. These are truly historical collective achievements designed to ensure that the events of that time are forever preserved in the collective memory.
Throughout the past 65 years, ever since it was founded, UNESCO has also tirelessly strengthened its educational activities in the name of peace and respect for human rights with the aim of ensuring that genocide and intolerance never occur again. In 2007, the General Conference of UNESCO adopted an important resolution to develop special outreach programmes in this field.

Today, UNESCO once again welcomes the winners of the international Holocaust essay contest. I should like, in my capacity as Chairperson of the Executive Board of UNESCO, to underscore the Organization’s commitment to mobilizing civil society so as to preserve the memory of this unprecedented human disaster.
This educational, critical and analytical function occupies a central place in UNESCO’s endeavours to develop and strengthen the conscience of the younger generations. After all, for them, what matters is gaining knowledge of freedom and of the dangers which can engender hatred, fanaticism, racism and prejudice.
Our children and grandchildren must never become neither victims nor perpetrators nor mere observers of such acts, and to that end they need to know and remember the tragic history of the Holocaust. Paying our respects to the courage and selflessness of people doomed to an unavoidable death, to all the victims and the saviours, means fighting oblivion.

Clearly, countries which have known the hell of war and peoples which have borne incalculable loss cannot fail to react extremely sharply to attempts to revive fascism and anti-Semitism in the world. “Violence can only be concealed by a lie, and the lie can only be maintained by violence.” Who could not agree with Solzhenitsyn’s words? By erasing and rewriting humanity’s collective memory, a direct link to the past is broken, and this, unfortunately, does not serve the interests of the present or of the future.
Those who survived the hell of war and the furnaces of the concentration camps are all the more precious and dear to us, as they may still bring home to us the reality of life and death of an age we would like to believe has gone for ever. One of these living legends is the writer Samuel Pisar, whom I should like to thank from the bottom of my heart for being with us here today. Another of those undisputed genuine heroes with similarly extraordinary fate is the renowned social activist Simon Wiesenthal, who bequeathed us his Centre on the Holocaust and the Museum of Tolerance.
UNESCO is extremely proud that in its educational activity to inculcate the ideas of the defence of peace in the minds of people it can depend on the experience and close cooperation of organizations like the Simon Wiesenthal Centre and the Russian Research and Educational Holocaust Centre. Our shared determination to ensure universal vigilance compels us to give broad dissemination to education and the study of history. The categories and scale may differ, ranging from schools to the national media, and from municipal museum programmes to historical research by individuals. This particular instance concerns the international Holocaust essay contest, the primary aim of which is to seek paths to tolerance. Both the geographical origins of the prize-winners, and the thematic approaches used in their essays are wide-ranging. But they are all united by the memory of the Holocaust. And that is our collective memory.
“The disaster must never happen again. Anywhere. Ever.”
Finding the point of no return for intolerance is the responsibility of society as a whole and each of us individually.
I congratulate all the prize-winners and extend to them my best wishes for numerous valuable achievements in the future.



The new Review about "Il’ja Al’tmann, Opfer des Hasses: Der Holocaust in der UdSSR 1941–1945.

28 2010

The new Review about "Il’ja Al’tmann, Opfer des Hasses: Der Holocaust in der UdSSR 1941–1945. Mit einem Vorwort von Hans-Heinrich Nolte; aus dem Russischen
von Ellen Greifer; Redaktion: Jens Binner. Gleichen: Muster-Schmidt, 2008, 588 pp."
Feferman, Kiril, “Binding the Unbound: The Shoah in the Soviet Union according to Ilya Altman,”  review of Opfer des Hasses. Der Holocaust in der UdSSR 1941-1945, by Ilya Altman, Yad Vashem Studies 38, 1 (2010): 239-246.
Download


 


Russian Christians, Jews urge country to establish Holocaust Memorial Day

27 2010

MOSCOW, May 27 (RIA Novosti)
Christians and Jews in Russia called on the government on Thursday to establish National Holocaust Memorial Day.
The call was made in the Memorial Synagogue near Moscow's Poklonnaya Gora, where Christian and Jewish organizations gathered for a roundtable to discuss dialogue between the two religions.
"The participants of the roundtable declare that further Jewish-Christian dialogue should be open, trust-based, long-term and be translated into practical activity, which is able to strengthen the tolerance of Russian society," a joint statement said.
The practical activity, the participants said, should be related to commemorating the victims of the Holocaust and include educational programs as well as establishing monuments and memorials in places of mass killings of Jews during WWII.
"We call on the Russian president, the Federation Council and the State Duma [the upper and lower houses of the Russian parliament] to introduce National Holocaust Memorial Day to be declared on January 27, the date when [the Soviet] Army liberated the Auschwitz death camp," the statement said.
The UN declared January 27, when the Soviet Red Army liberated the largest Nazi Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp, International Holocaust Memorial Day in 2005.

http://en.rian.ru/russia/20100527/159183369.html





Russian Christians, Jews urge country to establish Holocaust Memorial Day

27 2010


The call was made in the Memorial Synagogue near Moscow's Poklonnaya Gora, where Christian and Jewish organizations gathered for a roundtable to discuss dialogue between the two religions.
"The participants of the roundtable declare that further Jewish-Christian dialogue should be open, trust-based, long-term and be translated into practical activity, which is able to strengthen the tolerance of Russian society," a joint statement said.
The practical activity, the participants said, should be related to commemorating the victims of the Holocaust and include educational programs as well as establishing monuments and memorials in places of mass killings of Jews during WWII.
"We call on the Russian president, the Federation Council and the State Duma [the upper and lower houses of the Russian parliament] to introduce National Holocaust Memorial Day to be declared on January 27, the date when [the Soviet] Army liberated the Auschwitz death camp," the statement said.
The UN declared January 27, when the Soviet Red Army liberated the largest Nazi Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp, International Holocaust Memorial Day in 2005.

http://en.rian.ru/russia/20100527/159183369.html



The Russian Research and Educational Holocaust Center signed an agreement with the Ruprecht-Kalrs-University Heidelberg about cooperation.

24 2010

24.Mai 2010. The Russian Research and Educational Holocaust Center signed an agreement with the Ruprecht-Kalrs-University Heidelberg about cooperation. Among other things there is going to be an international symposium about “Occupation press in the Soviet Union, 1941-1944” in Heidelberg. This is a result of Dr. Altmans visit in Heidelberg last winter and his negotiations with Professor Löwe. The Russian Research and Educational Holocaust Center is looking forward to work with the Ruprecht-Karls-University Heidelberg.  




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